Alcibiades and Socrates are two interchangeable paintings which accompany the works Teleny, Medea and Xantippe. They both illustrate a painting described in Teleny, or the Reverse of the Medal, an anonymous pornographic novel published in 1893. The character Briancourt, when explaining his new painting of Jesus, John, and ‘one of the many adulterous Marys’ to the lovers Camille and Teleny, declares: '[...] to render my idea clearer, I’ll paint a pendant to it: “Socrates — the Greek Christ, with Alcibiades, his favourite disciple.” The woman will be Xantippe.'

The paintings are mounted on steel frames modelled after a sacrifical post that features in Pier Paolo Pasolini's Medea (1969).